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Emotional Intelligence for Executive Assistants

This interview was first published in April 2019. Author Jan Jones
interviews business trainer and consultant Heather Dallas about the
relevance of Emotional Intelligence for executive assistants.

Emotional Intelligence is a hot topic, but it is not a new idea. The term “Emotional Intelligence” was coined by two psychology
professors, John Mayer and Peter Salovey, in 1990. In 1995 Daniel Goleman wrote the book “Emotional Intelligence” and followed up with an article for Harvard Business Review called “What Makes A Leader”. The article contributed to the topic becoming important for business leaders and business people in general. Emotional
Intelligence is about our inter-personal and intra-personal skills. It is typically abbreviated as “EI” or “EQ” (Emotional Quotient).

These days, business is placing a premium on employees’ emotional intelligence. What’s important to the executive, must be important to the executive’s assistant. If the executive is focusing on
developing emotional intelligence personally, or within the
organization, then the assistant must do likewise. With this in mind, Jan Jones invited business trainer and consultant Heather Dallas to speak with her about the work she is doing teaching businesses about emotional intelligence, and more specifically, her work
teaching assistants about emotional intelligence. You can read about Heather’s background at the end of this interview.

Jan Jones: Heather, apart from the fact that their executives are
serious about understanding and developing emotional intelligence, why is EI relevant for executive assistants?

Heather Dallas: I’ve seen growing interest in this topic over the past few years and clients are asking about it more and more. I teach a course on emotional intelligence for executive assistants, and have seen a considerable increase in interest recently. Assistants
understand that as they serve their executives and the organization at large, they need to develop the vital skills that make up the
components of emotional intelligence. Because executive assistants are the public “face” of their executives, in many ways it is even more important for them to embody the traits of emotional intelligence, which are:

  • Self-Awareness
  • Self-Regulation
  • Motivation
  • Empathy for Others
  • Social Skills (Relationship building and management).

JJ: I heard Daniel Goleman speak at a conference. He said that
basically emotional intelligence is how we handle ourselves, manage ourselves, lead ourselves, and how we handle our relationships.

HD: Yes, and here are a couple of theoretical definitions I use to
explain emotional intelligence: “The ability to understand how
emotions affect behavior, and do something with that information”, and “Developing awareness of your emotions and behaviors through self-reflection and noting feedback from others”.

JJ: I like the idea that in addition to understanding how emotions
affect behavior, that there is guidance on what to do with that
information. Otherwise it is just intellectual understanding and we need to be able to put the ideas into practice at work every day.

HD: Exactly. In summary, it’s inter-personal skills, meaning how you relate to others, your rapport skills, which are the central pillars in communication. Your relationship management, your intra-personal skills, meaning how self-aware you are, how authentic you are. What buttons are you pressing in others that you are not aware of?

JJ: And how self-aware you are leads you to understand the effect your words and actions have on others. This is especially important for executive assistants who often have to relay messages from their executives to team members and employees across the
organization. If the executive is tone deaf, the assistant must make certain that they finesse the message in order to make it easier for others to digest. I had one job in particular where I became an expert at tempering the tone of my executive’s communications. People would remark to me how much more “mellow” my executive had
become. But I didn’t always have that expertise. When I first started as an assistant, I thought I was supposed to mirror the tone of my
executive. This caused problems until a colleague helped me to
understand that I could convey the message just as easily and
effectively, if I took the sharp edges off. It was an early lesson in EI about building business social skills.

Heather, what are some other elements that can help executive
assistants develop and expand their EQ, in order to increase their effectiveness in the EA role?

HD: Some other building blocks that make up emotional intelligence are:

Self-Awareness: Understanding your strengths, weaknesses, needs, what drives you. Being authentic, aware of the buttons you are pressing in others. Do you perceive yourself as others perceive you?

Motivation: Level of energy, passion, personal drive and enthusiasm for work, and commitment to goals. Being optimistic and positive. The desire for achievement and challenge.

Empathy: The ability to recognize, be sensitive to and consider
others’ feelings, needs and perspectives. Being able to understand, help and work with others and take an active interest in their concerns.

Decisiveness: Willingness to make decisions. The need for control and the level of comfort you have with decision-making responsibility.

Influence: The drive to influence, inspire and persuade others. To be heard and have an impact.

Adaptability: The desire for, and enjoyment of, variety in the workplace, the capacity to keep an open mind and be flexible with different and creative approaches. Being willing to make adjustments as necessary.

Conscientiousness: The need to plan and have structure, be diligent and meet deadlines, the level of comfort with conforming and
following the rules.

Stress Resilience: The capability to relax and deal with the day-to-day pressures of work, the level of comfort with showing and
managing emotions. For example, controlling or hiding your temper when provoked.

JJ: It has to start with self-awareness. The statistic is that the
average person experiences emotions 90% of the time. Even though we are emotional beings, we don’t typically make much effort to
become aware of our emotions.

HD: We have to become aware of our emotions in the moment they are happening and understand the effects those emotions are
having on ourselves and others. When you are experiencing
emotions such as anger or frustration, just slow down for a moment. I know in your book you interviewed the gentleman who teaches Mindfulness at Google. He said to stop and take a breath.

JJ: Yes, it was Chade Meng who talked about that. He also suggested that when you sit down with your executive, or your team, before you dive into the matters at hand, everyone should just close their eyes and take a breath together.

For me, as I was rushing into my meetings with my executive, I
always paused and took a deep breath. That one small action helped to center me and clear my mind so that I could be fully present to what my boss needed, rather than only being focused on getting
answers to my agenda items. It made for productive meetings
because we both accomplished our objectives in those meetings, even if on some days they were brief. When I got back to my desk and had a multitude of things I needed to get done, I simply took a breath and told myself ‘OK where do we need to start?’ That small step of taking a breath brought clarity and calm from where I
proceeded to tackle my projects. Sometimes, when I saw someone who was hard to deal with approaching my desk, I’d do the same thing – just close my eyes for a second and take a breath to help me center myself and be present to what they wanted in that moment, rather than focusing on their past behavior, or my feelings about them.

HD: We have to learn to consciously control our emotions so we can respond appropriately. And there are times when there is no need for a response. Awareness is enough. Self-regulation shows
discipline. It is a sign of maturity. There are some EI habits we are
already good at and others will require practice.

JJ: I was surprised when I first heard of Motivation as being part of EI. I’ve always thought of motivation as an internal drive, something that is propelled by my personal passions and desires, pushing me to high achievement. I thought of EI as being external, influencing my inter-personal actions, how I related and acted with others.

HD: You are spot-on about motivation, Jan, but remember, EI is not only about the social side (our behavior with/towards others), it’s also about our “behavior” with ourselves. Self-Awareness,
Self-Regulation and Motivation are the “Self” side of EI and Empathy and Social Skills are the “Social” side, the inter-personal, people skills side of EI.

To elaborate on your comments about motivation, it is important for assistants to have a regular personal check-in to examine what they need to do to keep motivated. Reminding yourself of your purpose is one way to rekindle your passion. What are you passionate about at work? Is it appreciation, more involvement, power, authority,
intellectual stimulation, the culture and working environment,
promotion prospects? Whatever it is that keeps you motivated and excited, find ways to do more of it. One daily exercise my clients find useful for motivation is to list “3 good things that happened to me today.”

JJ: I hope assistants will take note of this, Heather, because there are assistants who wait for their executive to motivate them. They
expect their executive to provide exciting projects for them to work on, or find ways to keep them happy and challenged. When
assistants tell me they need more challenge in the job, my response often is that they should look for ways to challenge themselves. What can I do to keep interested and motivated? What’s not getting done that I can do? What initiative can I take on a project that doesn’t rely on my boss for direction or approval? What task will help excite me to stretch my ability and thinking, so when it’s done, I can truly appreciate myself and the effort I made?

Can you share an example of how you have worked with EAs on EI?

HD: Sure. A good example is the work I’ve been doing with an
executive assistant in a global pharmaceutical organization who is remotely managing other EAs in her company’s European offices. When we started working together, Elizabeth’s Empathy was an 8 (out of 10). She needed to bring that down as she was spending too much time on not offending her team and giving them feedback in a sensitive way. This linked in with her Stress Resilience that was only 2. Through awareness and coaching, Elizabeth is now a 7 on Stress Resilience, a 5 on Empathy and a 7 on Decisiveness.

JJ: What I like about the work you are doing is how EAs can learn to increase their EI, not only in developing their talent for management and leadership within their role, but also to make them more
effective in growing that ability to take on additional opportunities.

HD: In my 30 years of experience working with EAs all over the world, I’ve seen a lot of under-utilized EA potential. My work with emotional intelligence can give assistants a framework to develop their skills, their awareness and fine-tune their communication ability.

*Further reading for developing potent “Intangible” skills for
becoming a multi-faceted, exceptional executive assistant.

Are Executive Assistants Servant-Leaders?

Exemplary Followership: How Smart Assistants Get Ahead


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About Heather Dallas: A former executive assistant, Heather Dallas’ last EA role was at Deloitte UK. In 1990 she was asked to move into a new training role to introduce inter-personal skills training for the 1500 support staff at Deloitte UK, as well as many of the Deloitte offices
globally. Heather left Deloitte in 2000 to set-up her own training and coaching business. After 19 years, Heather is proud to say she is still
running programs for Deloitte.

Heather offers a range of programs for executive assistants including
Presentation Skills, Team workshops, Personality Profiling, Project
Management, Management Skills, The Mini-MBA for Executive
Assistants and Emotional Intelligence, designed for in-house programs and public courses, in the UK and internationally. Jan Jones Worldwide has proudly presented Heather’s training skills for events in numerous
international training locations, including The Middle East, Australia and New Zealand. Heather has been passionate about developing the role of the executive assistant for nearly 30 years and has an outstanding record with satisfied clients.

To book Heather Dallas for your company in-house, association, or public training events, contact www.theceossecretweapon.comWatch for announcements of Heather’s upcoming international training dates.


About Jan Jones: Jan Jones spent 20 years as a distinguished
international executive assistant to successful business people around the world. She is a passionate advocate for the executive assistant profession, mentoring assistants and guiding executives through her writing,
speaking and consulting. She is the author of 
The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and
Effectiveness” which debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New Releases in the Office Management category. The book has received widespread acclaim from executives and assistants worldwide.
www.theceossecretweapon.com

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Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Author: Jan Jones

©Copyright Jan Jones, 2015 “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ new book and visit her website: The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness


We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram for the latest news and updates from
FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

 

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Fall Travel Reminders

As you’re savoring the last few weeks of summer and starting to think about fall, we are ready and at your service to provide flight quotes for your upcoming trips. We are happy to see that many of our corporate fliers, as well as our family travelers, are filling the private skies. If your company has any autumn travel on the calendar, please do not hesitate to call or email our Client Services team for a flight quote.

Autumn flight

It is also not too early to take advantage of availability and options for fall travel and events. As the weather gets colder heading into fall, the demand for jet charter will increase.

When the inclement weather in the Northeast, Midwest and Pacific Northwest leads to unpredictable commercial flight delays and
cancellations, you have a better option. Conditions such as heavy fog, snow, sleet and ice can delay both commercial and private flights, but by choosing to charter a private aircraft, you may be able to avoid some of the inclement weather problems by flying into  smaller, alternate airports. In the event of a delay, choosing private jet charter also offers you flexibility, security and personalized
service to get you to your destination on time. Make sure your flights are booked in advance and leave all of the logistics to us!

Fall Travel Reminders

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and LinkedIn for the latest FlyPrivate news and information.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

More places to go this summer…

We hope you are enjoying your summer and wanted to take a minute to thank all of our customers who have already booked
summer and fall trips with us!

We are happy to see that many of our corporate fliers, as well as our family travelers, are filling the private skies. If your company has any summer travel on the calendar, please do not hesitate to call or email our Client Services team for a flight quote.

It is also not too early to take advantage of availability and options for fall travel and events. As the weather gets colder heading into fall, the demand for jet charter will increase.

When the inclement weather in the Northeast, Midwest and Pacific Northwest leads to unpredictable commercial flight delays and
cancellations, you have a better option. Conditions such as heavy fog, snow, sleet and ice can delay both commercial and private flights, but by choosing to charter a private aircraft, you may be able to avoid some of the inclement weather problems by flying into  smaller, alternate airports. In the event of a delay, choosing private jet charter also offers you flexibility, security and personalized
service to get you to your destination on time. Make sure your flights are booked in advance and leave all of the logistics to us!

Summer Trips on the Calendar?
FlyPrivate to attend:

Fall Travel Reminders

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While advanced booking is important heading into fall and winter, there is still plenty of summer left. If you haven’t booked, please let us know! It is the perfect time to start thinking about booking your commuter trips to your second homes and holiday travel, to get the best rates and flight options.

We appreciate your continued support of FlyPrivate and look
forward to your next trip! Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook,
Instagram
,
LinkedIn and Twitter for the latest FlyPrivate news and information.

Flight Request

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

How Much Can I Bring?

How Much Luggage Can I Bring?

We hear this exact question quite often from our clients. Many times our clients have very specific luggage requirements for their trips. They may need space for golf clubs, skis, firearms for a hunting trip, a baby stroller, or any number of things, in addition to their standard luggage requirements. The easiest way to determine which aircraft will suit your individual needs, is to keep in mind that
generally as the jets get larger and have a longer range, they also have more luggage space.

In-flight access to the luggage space depends on the type of aircraft. Some planes have access from within the cabin, some only through the outside of the plane, while others have luggage space and access from both the interior and exterior of the jet.

The number of passengers on the aircraft will also determine how much luggage space will be available. The range of the aircraft
corresponds directly to the jet’s total weight, so it’s very important that the pilot and/or charter company knows exactly what luggage you will be bringing on board.

Aircraft and Luggage Specifications

If you have already determined which aircraft you will flying on or prefer to travel on a specific model of jet, take a look at our Aircraft Specs to get an idea if that jet will suit your needs in terms of
passenger and luggage capacities.

While there are no clear-cut luggage restrictions for private jets,
everything undoubtedly has to fit on the aircraft. Sometimes the runway length can also affect the amount of weight a jet can carry. Work with your aviation provider prior to traveling so you can pack accordingly and choose the best jet option for your trip.

Please call or email our Client Services team so we can provide you with the best flight options and quotes to suit your trip.

Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and LinkedIn for the latest FlyPrivate news and information.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Summer Travel Plans?

Q. Where are you traveling this summer?
                              
A.  Wherever you want!

Summer is the perfect time to get away to your favorite vacation destination! Whether you desire to spend your free time in the Hamptons, on Nantucket, or prefer a
tropical island vacation, we have the jet to get you there and a hassle-free quoting and booking process.

Let us take you, your family, friends and pets directly to your destination so you can enjoy more days at your

destination and less time traveling. We offer the best
aircraft values through our trusted partnerships and invite you to experience the FlyPrivate difference.

Below are our customers’ top summer travel destinations.

At FlyPrivate you have instant access to all types of
aircraft including:

Have a trip coming up? Give us the details and contact us today for your best options and pricing.  

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram for the latest news and updates from
FlyPrivate.Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Your Jet Set Pet

Photo courtesy of Sit ‘N Stay Global

Pets & Jets: What You Need to Know

1. Always tell us in advance if you plan to travel with your pet. We want to ensure that your aircraft is pet friendly and the crew is not allergic to pets.

2. Keep in mind that the rules and regulations will change if you’re flying internationally and each country does have varying laws about the importation of pets.

3. Bring a small, carry-on kennel or crate so your pet is safe during take-off and landing. Most jets allow dogs to fly outside of the crate by their owners’ side during the rest of the flight, as long as they are well behaved.

4. If traveling with your dog, bring a harness in case there is
turbulence on the flight. This will allow the dog to be strapped to a designated seating area with his owner.

5. Bring a cozy blanket your dog can use as a bed during the flight. The blanket will also help protect the seats on the jet from damage.

6. If you’re flying during your pet’s mealtime, be sure to pack food for your dog or we will be happy to arrange to have dog treats on the flight.

7. You may also wish to bring a quiet toy or bone to keep your dog occupied and quiet during the flight.

8. Make sure your pet gets a bathroom break before boarding the aircraft. If you’re planning a longer trip and need a stop-over during your flight to give your dog a break, let us know in advance and we will arrange this for you.

Photo courtesy of the Robb Report

Flying with Pets in the U.S.

The US Department of Transportation and the Department of
Agriculture has the following guidelines for flying with pets within the United States:

1. Dogs & cats must be at least 8 weeks old.
2. Animals must already have been weaned.
3. You must carry proof of a rabies vaccination.
4. Each State has specific Centers for Disease Control (CDC).

Dog Pilot_background

Our experts are always at your service. Please contact us if you have any questions about pet-friendly flights or if we can help you book your next trip.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and Instagram for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Is Saying “No” Smart Business Practice for Executive Assistants?

FlyPrivate: Is saying “no” smart business practice for executive
assistants?
Typically executive assistants do what their boss asks, but sometimes a situation arises where the assistant feels they can’t oblige because they are being asked to meet unrealistic deadlines, or the tasks are not clearly defined.  Some assistants have said that they say “no” to their boss, others say they may be inclined to “push back” on certain
requests that they consider unreasonable.  In these situations how would you advise assistants to respond to such requests?

Jan Jones: Being an executive assistant requires a lot of flexibility. Assistants are constantly being asked to shift priorities, or meet deadlines that crop up unexpectedly.  These things are part and
parcel of the assistant’s job.  If your boss is asking you to perform a task that relates to your job, or is part of your job description, then saying “no” or pushing back would not be smart business practice, or the first option to consider without an extremely valid reason for doing so.

I understand that Millennials want more autonomy and control over work conditions, but saying “no” or pushing back on legitimate work requests is not somewhere you should make it a habit of expressing your individuality, because you could end up losing your job if you are perceived as uncooperative or insubordinate.

Recently, it has become popular for business coaches to advise EAs that they should say no to their executives if they feel their workload is at capacity. What these coaches don’t understand about the EA role is that the majority of the EA’s workload stems from them being the assistant to their executive. Some assistants have additional
duties not directly tied to their executive, such as office
management or HR duties, but generally these accountabilities don’t take precedence over the EA’s availability for their executive’s
requirements. It is not usually at the EA’s discretion whether they will perform a task if their executive requests it. So it is risky for coaches to advise assistants to say things like “I’m not taking on new projects at the moment”, or “let me check my schedule and get back to you” when their executive asks them to do something. This
misdirection by coaches is causing confusion for many assistants, particularly those who are less experienced, or who don’t have a good rapport with their boss. They are conflicted about whether or not they should be taking direction from their executive (per their job description and common sense), or whether they should refuse to accept additional tasks because this is the latest buzz being spread in the EA world.

Let’s take a closer look at some examples where assistants might consider “pushing back”, and explore options that are more
productive than pushing back, or saying no.

Unreasonable Deadlines

Let’s say you’ve been given a huge amount of work that has to be completed by a specific deadline.  If you are unable or unsure of how to prioritize the work, ask your executive for guidance.  Explain that it is going to take a certain amount of time to do the tasks and you need to know which of the tasks is absolutely vital to get done to meet the deadline.

If you have an unreasonable executive who insists that all of it has to get done immediately and has equal priority, then tell the executive you are going to use your best judgment to determine which of the tasks has the highest priority. Quickly draft up the order of priority and ask your executive for input.  If you can’t get input, just get
started and do your best.  If they are not satisfied with the decisions you made, ask them how they would have prioritized so you will know in future and politely say that investing a little bit of time to guide you would have been helpful in getting the job done to their satisfaction.

EAs often ask me how to prioritize work when supporting several executives.  To do this effectively, at the outset you must establish a procedure for how you are going to prioritize everyone’s work.
Typically, the executive who is more senior gets a higher priority. If they are part of a team, likely they would know which project and which team member’s task should get priority in order to complete a project by deadline. If each one is saying their work is high priority, and if they are being unreasonable, if you are unable to determine by yourself which task should get the highest priority, then go to their boss and ask for guidance.  Politely make it clear you need help in
order to do the most effective job possible.  If speaking with their boss is not an option, then go to the executive who is typically the most reasonable of the bunch and ask for help.  Explain that you want to make everyone happy, but you simply can’t do all the tasks at the same time, so what do they suggest?

If no one is cooperating, respectfully ask them to work it out among themselves and get back to you as quickly as possible so you can move forward on the right track. That would be the most “push back” from an assistant that I would advise.

In the meantime, get started according to your understanding of which is the most important project.  Worst case, you will have to stop working on the task you selected as being important, and have to start something else.  But assistants are used to interruptions and switching quickly from one priority to another. Always behave
professionally, even if you want to wring their necks.

When things have calmed down, have another discussion with that team and reiterate that you want to do the best for them, but you must have their cooperation in sorting out how work is to be prioritized.

These are some reasons why it is important for the assistant to
understand the business they are in.  Having an understanding of the workings of the business lets the assistant make better judgments about which tasks are a priority.  When you understand the reason for why you are being asked to do something, there is less inclination to “push back” or say “no”, because you see the bigger picture of why something is necessary and needs to get done.  Then you pitch in enthusiastically.

When your executives see you taking an interest in knowing the business, they will start working collaboratively with you, rather than simply giving you instructions and asking you to carry them out. You may soon find that the unreasonable requests are diminishing, and your executives start to treat you with a new level of respect.

Last-Minute Emergencies

There are times when executives haven’t planned sufficiently and are asking you to do things at the last minute, which may involve staying late, or changing your personal plans.  If there is a day when you absolutely have to leave by a certain time, be proactive and give your team plenty of notice that you have to leave and will not be able to take on any last-minute jobs. Then there’s no question of pushing back because you’ve told them in plenty of time you will not be
available.  If your executive has a habit of giving you things at the last minute, discuss with them that you can’t always accommodate last-minute requests.  Ask what you can do to help the executive plan their day. Sometimes last minute requests are completely
unavoidable because things do crop up unexpectedly. Do your best to oblige without being resentful. You are better off with a
reputation for being cooperative than for pushing back or saying no.

Not Part of Your Job Description

So what? If you are being asked to do things that are not part of your job description, consider the nature of the request and who is
asking.  Always consider the bigger picture.  Even if it’s not in your job description, it could lead to something bigger and better for you.  Maybe it gives you a chance to work on a project that expands your sphere of influence.  It could give others in the company exposure to you.  Let them see you at your best and spread the word about how outstanding your work is and how cooperative you are.  How would that hurt you?

At one job I had, once in a while our CEO’s housekeeper was away and he’d bring his dog to work.  A few times during the day I would take the dog out for a quick walk.  Certainly not something in my job description, but as assistant to the CEO I knew the value of his time so I was happy to do that for him and he was grateful that he didn’t have to stop what he was doing to take the dog out. If you can be generous, be generous.  It makes everyone feel good and people
remember you for it.

Instead of being quick to “push back” or say “no”, find a way to get the job done even if it requires some sacrifice on your part. I’m not saying make yourself a martyr, but if you can accommodate
requests, do so.

Take a lesson from comedian, Tina Fey who said: “Say yes and you’ll figure it out afterwards.” Why? “Because the fun is always on the other side of the ‘yes’.” Not just in your job, but in your life, stop
pushing back and start saying “yes”.  For EAs who are reading this, some day I’d love to hear your success stories about the miraculous journey on which that simple word “yes” has taken you.

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series!

Author: Jan Jones

©Copyright Jan Jones, 2015 “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”

Jan Jones Worldwide

Visit Amazon to purchase Jan Jones’ new book and visit her website: The CEO’s Secret Weapon.

The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones

_________________________________________________________________________

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram for the latest news and updates from
FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

 

An executive’s time is worth $19,000 per day. We can help increase it by 100%.

Wall Street

It’s a fact that using private aviation adds hours and hours of valuable time for executives and their organizations. If an executive or an executive team is compensated $1M annually, they are worth $19,000 a day to an organization. In most cases, we can add a day of productivity, increasing production by 100% .  Don’t waste hours of their time or value using commercial travel.

For 17 years FlyPrivate has saved companies millions of dollars in private aviation costs while increasing utilization with our
innovative programs.

Have a trip coming up? Give us the details. Our service is free to join and you pay as you fly. It couldn’t be easier.

We look forward to becoming a trusted member of your
organization.

Flight Request

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Instagram for the latest news and updates from
FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Spring Travel Plans?

It’s that time again…The snow is starting to melt, the temperature is slowly getting warmer, and many of you are planning your spring migration back north. As winter finally fades, we wanted to be the first to welcome you to spring!
 
We are ready and at your service for your next trip and strongly encourage you to contact us now for your best flight options and pricing. Private aviation is very popular at this time of year. Most south to north flights are booked during the same weeks every year and we want to make sure you get the aircraft you need, when you need it.
 
For those new to private aviation, FlyPrivate has many benefits to you, your family and/or fellow travelers.
  • Significantly reduce your door to door travel time.
  • Experience the unmatched comfort and luxury of
    private jet charter, especially ideal for anyone who travel has become more difficult for due to mobility, petsbaggage, or other matters.   
  • See how our unique business model sets us apart from the rest. Here are 15 Reasons to FlyPrivate.
Please call or email our Client Services team right away so we can provide you with the best flight options and quotes to suit your trip.
 

Spring Travel Reminders

  • NCAA Basketball Finals & Championship: March 30th – April 8th – Minneapolis, MN
  • The PGA Masters: April 11th-14th – Augusta, GA
  • NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs Begin: April 10th
  • NBA Playoffs Begin: April 13th
  • The Kentucky Derby: May 4th – Louisville, KY
  • Wimbledon: July 1st – July 14th – Wimbledon, England

Popular Spring and Summer Travel Destinations

  • Europe
  • Caribbean
  • New England
  • Canada
  • Colorado
  • Michigan

Early booking allows us to provide creative options which may not be available later in the season. We look forward to working with you!

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and Twitter for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

 

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

FlyPrivate to The Masters© 2019

Photo courtesy of The Masters© Golf Tournament

The Masters© Golf Tournament is right around the corner and the Augusta National Golf Club is not the only place in the Augusta area busy preparing for the festivities to be held April 11th-14th, 2019. If you’re planning to use private aviation to get you to and from the
action on the fairway, it is imperative that you plan ahead. With
thousands of private aircraft expected to be traveling through two of the most popular local FBOs, Augusta Regional Airport (AGS) and Aiken Aviation Enterprises (AIK), flights book quickly and arrival slots and parking is limited.

Over the years, we’ve had the chance to interview the Director of Aviation Services at AGS and the Customer Service Supervisor at AIK, to ask them what passengers should expect when flying into the area during The Masters© week. They also gave us an inside look at what it takes to prepare for such a large international event and how they will accommodate all of the additional travelers. Enjoy!

Photo courtesy of The Masters© Golf Tournament

FlyPrivate®: “What are you doing to prepare for the influx of
traffic expected during The Masters© tournament?”

AGS Director of Aviation Services: “We start the planning process as
early as August. We review items from the previous year’s event and
continually make tweaks to the operations to ensure that the proper staffing levels and supplies are sufficient. We have implemented an
aircraft parking reservation system which will help maximize ramp space utilization.”

AIK Customer Service Supervisor: “To prepare for the influx of traffic
during The Masters tournament, Aiken Aviation takes many steps to
ensure a convenient and pleasurable experience for each individual. Aiken Aviation brings in additional fuel trucks for speedy fueling,
additional transportation to transport passengers and pilots to and from their aircraft if needed, and the line and customer service hours are
extended to accommodate those arriving or departing outside of our
normal operating hours.”

FlyPrivate®: “Do you plan to ramp up staff for the event? If so,
approximately by how much?”

AGS: “Yes, we bring in additional fuelers and customer service support. We normally operate with 15 employees but that number increases to 65 during Master’s week.”

AIK: “Aiken Aviation is doubling its staff for the event in order to swiftly and professionally accommodates each aircraft.”

Photo courtesy of The Masters© Golf Tournament

FlyPrivate®: “On average, how many flights in and out of AGS and AIK do you expect during these dates?”

AGS:Augusta Regional Airport typically has about 2000 operations
during the week and we’re expecting a slight improvement for this year.”

AIK: Aiken Aviation has a little over 400 arrivals during the week of The Masters. This year we are looking forward to another great week of flights.”

FlyPrivate®: “Which dates are the most popular for flights?
(i.e. What are the busiest days?)”

AGS: “Thursday is probably the busiest day because it’s the first official day for tournament play followed by the last day, Sunday evening. It’s hustle and bustle to ensure that every flight is ready for departure. It’s an amazing site to see airplanes departing one right after another.”

AIK: “The latter part of the week is the most popular for flights, when the practice rounds are over and the rounds take place on that Thursday,
Friday, Saturday and Sunday.”

FlyPrivate®: “Do you have any preferred vendors you would
recommend?”

AGS: “I couldn’t pick just one, because they all do a nice job, but what I can say is that the southern hospitality will definitely be in full effect!”

FlyPrivate®: (Check out the Masters Housing Bureau for
properties to rent
during your visit to The Masters©.)

AIK: “Aiken Aviation recommends Enterprise Rent-A-Car service as they will be on site that week for all your needs. There are many wonderful
hotels in the area such as the Town Place Suites and the Hilton Garden Inn, just to name a few.  Downtown Aiken offers beautiful scenery with an array of unique and delicious eateries from coffee shops, diners and delis to three course gourmet restaurants.”

Photo courtesy of The Masters© Golf Tournament

FlyPrivate®: “Is there anything else you would like our readers to know about AGS and AIK that may be helpful when planning their trip?”

AGS: “Plan carefully and super early with respect to lodging, and
transportation. Most importantly enjoy your golf experience, most people never get the opportunity.”

AIK: “It is a pleasant surprise at how easy and convenient it is to fly in and out of Aiken, plus we are an easy, non-congested drive (about 27 minutes) on Interstate 20 to get to the Augusta National Golf Course. Our prompt and personalized attention along with our Southern hospitality is always a delight. We are well-known for our superior customer service and we will strive to make all trips to Aiken, SC a memorable one.”