Tag Archives: Business Travel

How Much Can I Bring?

How Much Luggage Can I Bring?

We hear this exact question quite often from our clients. Many times our clients have very specific luggage requirements for their trips. They may need space for golf clubs, skis, firearms for a hunting trip, a baby stroller, or any number of things, in addition to their standard luggage requirements. The easiest way to determine which aircraft will suit your individual needs, is to keep in mind that
generally as the jets get larger and have a longer range, they also have more luggage space.

In-flight access to the luggage space depends on the type of aircraft. Some planes have access from within the cabin, some only through the outside of the plane, while others have luggage space and access from both the interior and exterior of the jet.

The number of passengers on the aircraft will also determine how much luggage space will be available. The range of the aircraft
corresponds directly to the jet’s total weight, so it’s very important that the pilot and/or charter company knows exactly what luggage you will be bringing on board.

Aircraft and Luggage Specifications

If you have already determined which aircraft you will flying on or prefer to travel on a specific model of jet, take a look at our Aircraft Specs to get an idea if that jet will suit your needs in terms of
passenger and luggage capacities.

While there are no clear-cut luggage restrictions for private jets,
everything undoubtedly has to fit on the aircraft. Sometimes the runway length can also affect the amount of weight a jet can carry. Work with your aviation provider prior to traveling so you can pack accordingly and choose the best jet option for your trip.

Please call or email our Client Services team so we can provide you with the best flight options and quotes to suit your trip.

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Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

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Jet Puzzle? Solved!

FlyPrivate

When it comes to reoccurring use of a private jet, there are many options. You can own the entire jet with full control, you can purchase fractional ownership, you can secure a fixed number of hours in a single aircraft or join an access membership.

All options sound easy but all require that you tie up substantial
capital to forecast (an inexact science) future use.

What if you fly more or less? What if you need a different size jet in a different part of the country? What if you have a round trip? What if you have a one-way? Now it is not so simple, now it is a puzzle!

What if there was a way not to tie up your money in some type of jet access or with some kind of long term commitment and only get a jet when you need a jet? What if there was a way to have access to hundreds of different types of jets? What if you only paid when you used a jet, with no long term financial commitment or no required money to spend before you need a jet?

Well here’s some good news – there is! I don’t know your situation but I do know this. You CAN have it all! No long term commitment. No paying the overhead associated programs. Get the jet you need, only when you need it. What could be better than that?

My name is Don Smith, COO of FlyPrivate – I’d love to tell you more about what we do differently so you can decide if it makes sense to explore what we do further.

Don’t worry – no sales pitch on my end. Just some basic information you might want to consider and I’ll be happy to share more
information about a new way to fly that has revolutionized private jet use for customers like you.

If you’re a bit intrigued, pick up the phone and give me a call at (800) 641-5387 or send me an e-mail at dsmith@flyprivate.com.

I look forward to speaking with you!

Best,

Don Smith
Chief Operating Officer
FlyPrivate
www.flyprivate.com
fly@flyprivate.com
1-800-641-5387

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, Twitter and Google+ for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

If the Need is Speed, Look to Citation X

Citation X+
Photos courtesy of Cessna

In 1990 Citation customers sought increased baggage capacity, longer range and more speed. At that time Lear jets were the
champions of speed and range but were limited on cabin size and baggage area. Cessna needed to develop something bold for their loyal following.

Citation X+ Interior

Using the same fuselage diameter as their popular Citation VII (5’6″ x 5’8″) the Cessna design team developed 35% more baggage
capacity and stretched the cabin length by 25%. Engineers doubled the thrust of the engines, increased their intake capacity and
adjusted the sweep of the wing. The result was a stunning increase in cruising speed from 506 mph to 604 mph with top speed
capability of 699 mph, creating not only a faster jet, but also a
revolutionary new model. The six-year project culminated in the birth of the “fastest civilian aircraft in the world”, the Citation X
(roman numeral ten).

Citation X+

The increased speed and 3,000-mile range make the Citation X very popular for coast-to-coast trips and for customers who are looking to take advantage of the possible time-saving. The fastest we have ever tracked one of our customers in a Citation X was 627 mph on a trip from SNA-TEB. This resulted in a one-hour time-saving over a heavy or midsize jet.

The Citation X is classified as a super midsize jet.

Citation X+

If you have the need for speed we have your answer. FlyPrivate
customers have on-demand access to the entire national and
international charter fleet of the Citation X. They are popular
aircraft and book up as swiftly as they fly.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Take Your Next Trip in a Falcon 50

Falcon 50 The Falcon 50 is often used as a cost effective alternative to a heavy jet. This jet features a galley with plenty of space for meal service, a fully enclosed lavatory, enough baggage space to accommodate 8 full-size suitcases or sets of golf clubs, and often comes equipped with a cabin attendant and Wi-Fi. The cabin is very comfortable with leather chairs, fold-out tables, and couch seating. The quiet cabin makes the Falcon 50 ideal for business meetings or just relaxing.

The Dassault Falcon 50 is a super midsize jet designed to meet the demand and need for an aircraft that could travel non-stop, coast to coast. The Falcon 50 is the Falcon family’s first transoceanic aircraft based on the earlier design of the Falcon 20. The Falcon 50 typically seats 9 and can travel 3,500 nautical miles at average speeds up to 496 mph. It also offers impressive runway performance,
requiring only a short takeoff distance.

The Falcon 50 was produced after a complete redesign of the wings of the Falcon 20 and contains three jet engines instead of the two jet engines on board the Falcon 20. This made the Falcon 50 the world’s first civilian jet with supercritical wings to minimize drag and noise pollution, a breakthrough technology for the time.

Falcon 50The Falcon 50 EX, an upgraded version of the Falcon 50, was later introduced and designed to fly a bit higher and faster than the
original Falcon 50, while also reducing fuel consumption by about 7%.

Falcon 50 InteriorTo request a Falcon 50 for your next trip, please contact us. We would be happy to provide you with a flight quote.

Falcon 50 Aircraft Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

You’ll Love the Citation Excel!

Citation Excel

The Cessna Citation Excel was first introduced to the world in 1997. The Citation Excel was modeled around the airframe of larger, super midsize jet the Citation X. The Citation Excel wings were modeled from the Citation Ultras and the fuselage is basically the same as the Citation VII, which the Excel has since replaced.

The Citation Excel (also referred to as the Citation XL, Citation XLS, or Citation XLS+) was designed for travelers looking for the space, range and comforts of a midsize jet with the cost, takeoff, and
landing capabilities of a light jet. The Excel can reach full altitude in only 18 minutes and can take off from shorter runways than any other midsize jet. The pilot-friendly design of the cockpit on the
Citation Excel allows for an easy preflight check and the Honeywell Primus 1000 avionics system allows pilots to have all the
information they need on only three display screens.

Citation Excel

The interior of the Citation Excel can comfortably fit up to
8 passengers with several different cabin configurations. The cabin is over 18 feet long with enough height to stand up in, over a half of a foot taller than other jets in the midsize class. The interior also has sliding headrests, fold-out tables, a refreshment center, and is
quieter than competing jets. The Citation Excel has a generous
baggage compartment providing 80 cubic feet of external storage and another internal closet to hold a few smaller items.

The Citation Excel truly is a favorite amongst private fliers. There are more flights flown on a Citation Excel than any other model of aircraft. Cessna has since developed updated models of the Excel, the Citation XLS and XLS+, with newer avionics and engine
computers. The Excel is so popular because it offers the range,
comfort, and baggage capacity of a midsize jet while operating more like a light jet with it’s runway capabilities and value for the money.

To request a Citation Excel for your next trip, please contact us. We would be happy to provide you with a flight quote.

Citation Excel Aircraft Specifications

Citation XLS Aircraft Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Cheers for the Citation Bravo

The Cessna Citation Bravo was first certified in 1996 as an upgrade to the best-selling Citation II. With a number of improved features, this light jet is a favorite among customers looking for convenience and comfort.

The Citation Bravo has a long range when compared to other light jets, able to travel 1484 statute miles non-stop, easily flying from New York to Miami for example. The Bravo cruises at average speeds of 466 mph and offers impressive short runway capabilities, allowing it to be chartered in and out of smaller airports closer to your destination. While its costs are similar to the Citation II, it
surpasses it significantly in performance, using far less fuel per hour. The heightened performance of the Citation Bravo is largely due to the Pratt & Whitney turbofan engines and the Bravo was the first light jet to be equipped with them. New landing gear also makes landings much smoother than comparable jets, even on uneven pavement.

Citation Bravo

 

In terms of comfort, the Citation Bravo is at the top of its class. The engineers designed the Bravo to have a quiet cabin with insulation and isolated interior shell to eliminate engine noise, while a seal on the cabin door eliminates wind noise. The Bravo can accommodate seven passengers with club seating, and has a partial galley as well as a lavatory on board. The cabin measures 15′ 10″ in length, 4′ 9″ in height and 4′ 10″ in width. The baggage space in the Citation Bravo is generous at 78 cubic feet and can hold several suitcases and gold bags. There is also additional storage in drawers under the seats.

Citation Bravos are well liked among pilots because they are an easy jet to fly and can be flown solo. Pre-flight, service and
maintenance procedures were also designed to aid the flight crew, while the cockpit is equipped with systems to relay traffic
information, radar to watch the weather and digital maps. Between the unmatched operating costs and passenger comforts, it is easy to see why the Citation Bravo is a passenger and pilot favorite.

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and Google+ for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Very Light Jets: A Viable Option

Citation Mustang

The twin engine VLJ is a nice choice for shorter trips, combining the comfort of a jet with the economy and shorter field performance of the Turboprop.

Citation Mustang

Very Light Jets (VLJs) are small light aircraft that typically hold a small group of 4 or 5 passengers comfortably. The very light jets are a fairly new category of aircraft, and thus are equipped with the very latest in jet engine technology which delivers the speed, quality, and fuel efficiency that allow for a more cost effective means of private jet travel.

Eclipse 550

The Very Light Jet, entry-level jet or personal jet, previously known as a microjet, have slightly shorter cabins than light jets, but are
generally just as tall and wide. Most commonly available for charter are the Eclipse 500, Cessna Citation Mustang and the
Embraer Phenom 100. There have been thousands of VLJ’s
delivered since production began in 2007.

Phenom 100

Most of the deliveries to date have been to owner operators so
charter availability can be limited. For years we have been
presenting VLJ’s to our customers saving them substantial dollars and improving the quality of their flight experience.

Phenom 100

If you would like more information on the VLJ for charter, please contact us or request a flight quote. We look forward to helping you plan your next trip!

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+ and Instagram for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

 

Turboprops & Twin Pistons: Know Your Options

King Air 250

Photo Courtesy of Beechcraft

Aside from jet aircraft which range from very light jets to heavy jets, there is another significant player in the charter market. Turboprops are aircraft that utilize a gas jet engine to operate a propeller rather than jet thrust typically used on larger aircraft. Most turboprop
engines are manufactured Pratt & Whitney Canada and Honeywell, known in the aviation community for their reliability and power. As a predecessor to turboprops, the twin-piston aircraft are also a viable choice. Piston aircraft are typically smaller aircraft, seating up to 6 passengers. The piston aircraft are powered by piston engines (or reciprocating engines), and use heat to produce steam pressure, which in turn is used to generate a rotating motion that powers the engine.

Piaggio_P-180_Avanti_Int2

How do turboprops compare to jets? Turboprops are a great
solution for trips less than 500 miles (300 miles or less for
twin-piston aircraft) and for trips into airports with shorter runways inaccessible to larger jets. Unlike jets, many turboprops can easily land on shorter airstrips and can even land in grass airfields vs.
needing a traditional runway. While jets can travel at faster speeds than turboprops, having more options in regards to places to land, enables turboprop passengers to get closer to their destinations,
often saving time and money.

Piper Chieftain

Turboprops are generally less expensive to operate than jets. Fuel costs and other expenses like maintenance tend to also be lower for props, making them a great option for shorter trips. Seating varies by aircraft model from 4-8 passengers in most turboprops. While a bit smaller than their jet cousins, many turboprops offer comparable cabin comforts and are equipped for both business and relaxation in the air. Contrary to popular thought, modern day turboprops come equipped with  resonance technology that almost entirely cancels out the propeller noise, so they are not generally loud in the cabin. As far as storage, many turboprops have comparable baggage and cabin space as their jet counterparts.

Pilatus

There are several factors to consider when choosing an aircraft for your charter needs. Let us help you decide which will be best for your trip. In the meantime, check out our turboprop and twin-piston charter options below and click to view each aircraft’s specifications.

Avanti II P-180 Specifications

Cessna 421 Golden Eagle Specifications

Cessna 441 Conquest II Specifications

Grand Caravan Specifications

Jetstream 31 Specifications

King Air 90 Specifications

King Air 100 Specifications

King Air 200 Specifications

King Air 250 Specifications

King Air 300 Specifications

King Air 350 Specifications

Merlin III Specifications

Pilatus PC-12 Specifications

Piper Aztec Specifications

Piper Chieftain Specifications

Piper Cheyenne Specifications

Piper Meridian Specifications

Piper Navajo Specifications

Piper Seneca V Specifications

Socata TBM 850 Specifications

To request an aircraft recommendation, please contact us. We would be happy to provide you with several options and flight quotes.

Turboprop Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn Google+, Twitter and Instagram for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

Q & A with Jan Jones: Part 11 – Can Executive Assistants be effective working remotely?

Jan Jones is the author of “The CEO’s Secret Weapon How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness”. The book debuted at #1 on Amazon’s Hot New Releases in the Office Management Category. It has received widespread acclaim from executives and
executive assistants worldwide. Jan spent 20 years as an esteemed
international executive assistant to well-known business people,
including personal development icon and author Tony Robbins. Jan is passionate about the executive assistant role and continues to champion the profession through speaking, mentoring and offering timeless,
practical advice that is relevant to the day-to-day role of the executive assistant.


For the past three years, FlyPrivate has been a proud partner and associate of Jan Jones. Jan brings valuable, actionable information to EAs across the globe. We hope you enjoy her blogs as much as we do!

Want more from Jan Jones? Check out her Q & A Series: Part 1-10!

FlyPrivateCan executive assistants be effective if they are working remotely?  What about virtual assistants? Can executives have their business needs met by using remote or virtual assistants?

Jan Jones: As the old saying goes, “there’s horses for courses”.
Meaning depending on the circumstances or conditions, assistants can be effective working remotely and many executives can have their business needs met by using remotely-located or virtual
assistants. We should take a closer look at the circumstances under which executives could function effectively using assistants who are working remotely, or are virtual assistants, to determine how
effective they can be.

Let’s take working remotely first. Actually, this is not something new. I was recently speaking with a former CEO of an international fast food organization. He told me that in the 1980s, within a few months of each other, several of his company’s assistants became pregnant, or wanted to leave due to their childcare situations. Since they had been with the company a long time and he didn’t want to lose their years of experience, he set them up with computers in their homes. He told them, “I don’t care when or how you work, just get the work done and deliver it on time.”  Technology today makes computers affordable and the internet gives us immense freedom to work from just about anywhere we choose, so it makes sense that remote and virtual assistants are gaining in popularity.

But how suitable is it for an executive who needs a certain level of support from an assistant? I checked in with two of the best, most celebrated executive assistants I know: Penni Pike former assistant to Sir Richard Branson for 31 years and Debbie Gross who spent over 25 years as assistant to John Chambers, former CEO and
current Executive Chairman of Cisco Systems. Both ladies are
featured in my book “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”.

Penni told me “Richard included me in everything”, which is how she came to know and understand the Virgin business and what
mattered most to her boss. When I asked her about assistants
working remotely she said, “I can’t understand that because I always worked so closely with Richard. He needed his assistant by his side. People at the very top have to have someone who works with them like that. Otherwise, if they need something urgently, the assistant is not there. Richard needs someone with him all the time.”

Debbie Gross said, “For administrative professionals, working
remotely has become more of the ‘norm’ in today’s business world partly due to the change in business models.  Many administrators support teams that are based around the world and are never
actually in a traditional office.  With the advance in video
technologies, it has definitely become easier to work remotely.

“That being said, one of the key roles I believe an administrator plays is their ability to build relationships across all levels and be the eyes and ears for the people they support.  Harder to do effectively from a ‘home-office’ environment. This was a critical component of my role supporting a CEO making working remotely not really an
option. John always expected me to be the ‘face’ of the office
especially when he traveled.  When he would check in while on the road he always asked how things were going at the office, so I felt it was key that I be present there. It was about noticing what was
going on around me with other members of the organization and
being able to feel the pulse and morale and share that with John.  He was pretty adamant that executive assistants be in the office, so I am not sure I would have been hired to support him if one of my
requirements was to work from home. Many senior level executives prefer to have their executive assistants in the office, especially the higher they are in their organizations.”

This has also been my experience in my career as an executive
assistant. My jobs were much too interactive with my boss, staff, clients and vendors for me to be outside the office. Like Debbie Gross, my executives counted on me to be their ‘eyes and ears’ and their ‘face’ to the world. Situations were constantly arising that needed my immediate attention. Leaving my desk to go pick up a sandwich at lunchtime could prove tricky. When I worked for bosses who were constantly traveling, on the rare days they were
scheduled to be in the office, I brought my lunch to work so I would not have to be away from my desk for more than a few minutes. Meetings were being set up, canceled or moved at a moment’s
notice, people would drop by unannounced, phone calls were being made, sometimes I was holding 2 or 3 calls at the same time, project approvals were needed, documents required signature, and there were always more travel arrangements to be made, changed or
canceled. Most executives I worked for were constantly calling out for me and I tried to always be within earshot, or have my assistant or someone listen out and let me know if I was being yelled for.  How would I have managed all this remotely?

I am currently working on a project with an assistant who is located remotely and I find it arduous. Work that should take 2 days is taking 5 or 6 due to the back and forth across international time zones. Yet, I am constantly meeting assistants who say they’ve negotiated with their executives to work remotely. Perhaps these executives have become accustomed to doing many tasks their assistants should be doing, or much of the work their assistants do for them is not of an urgent or time-sensitive nature.  Their assistants probably aren’t functioning as their liaison or deputy as I did, or as Gross and Pike did for their executives.

A big negative with the arrangement of assistants working remotely is the burden it places on assistants who are working at the office. I hear complaints that the remote assistants show themselves as “available”, but when they are contacted they don’t respond for hours, sometimes even an entire day goes by when they are not
responding to emails, texts or phone calls.  The urgency arises to schedule or re-schedule meetings, for example, but the assistant can’t be reached. If the executive is traveling, neither the executive nor their assistant can be reached and too much time is being spent by other assistants trying to contact them, cover for them, or
wasting time putting their own tasks on hold waiting for a response. I’ve inquired why these assistants don’t insist HR or the remote
assistant’s boss does something about it. HR tells them the boss agreed the assistant could work remotely when they hired them, so there’s nothing they can do. This is a cop-out by HR and the
executive. They must step up and consider the overall effects this situation has on the company. If this arrangement were impeding my workplace productivity, I would actively agitate for it to be changed. I would lobby HR not to allow executives to agree to letting their
assistants work remotely, but instead offer it as an option with
certain conditions, mainly that the assistant proves they are mature and responsible enough to warrant that privilege.

The bigger concern I have for assistants working remotely is how do they learn the business? How do they grow and expand in the role if they are not there to witness the daily ins and outs of the business environment? How do they develop a relationship of trust and
familiarity with their executive if they are not in physical proximity to each other? Ultimately, are they setting themselves up to become redundant? With warnings about A.I. and virtual assistants stepping in to fill many of the routine tasks assistants do, I would pay close
attention to developing skills and processes that make me more valuable and available to my executive.

The exception to this is assistants who have been with their
executive a long time, have built up a strong relationship with an
understanding of the business and each other. If the business is in a mature phase, or the executive’s role is such that they can be gone for periods of time, their assistants have the freedom to work remotely.

Penni mentioned that she thought assistants working remotely might get lonely. Debbie also addressed this from her experience at Cisco. “3 years ago I came to recognize that at Cisco, there was a whole administrative community that worked remotely and in
talking with several of these administrative professionals it became clear that they all felt a sense of isolation from the broader
administrative community.  As a result we pulled together this group and created an initiative known as G.R.A.C.E. – Global Remote
Administrators Connecting Effectively.  This is a group of remote
administrators who come together once a quarter to discuss the challenges they are facing, as well as review of best practices that help them feel connected.

“One of the key areas discussed was the challenge of developing a relationship with the leader because they were remote.  I strongly encourage administrative professionals who are working remotely to make it a point to travel to the corporate office at least once a year and even better, quarterly if they can, in order to ‘connect’ with their peers, meet the people they interface with across the
organization and become ‘visible’ – putting a face to the voice.  I also always suggest that remote administrators attend networking events and administrative conferences to learn and engage with
others in their profession. Working remotely certainly has its
advantages. However, administrative professionals can be even more effective by not isolating themselves. I feel that it is in our
administrative DNA that we connect with others and build strong relationships and that means we have to get out of ‘home-office’
environment to do that.  Many of Cisco’s G.R.A.C.E. members are now coming to the corporate office and networking with their peers, enriching their relationships and friendships and growing their knowledge and ultimately being of greater assistance to the leaders they support.”

Virtual Assistants: I often meet assistants who tell me they are
toying with the idea of trying out being a VA because they perceive it as a freeing experience. The purpose of including information about the VA profession in this article is to help assistants understand what it takes to survive and thrive as a VA.

Thanks to technology, there is a role for virtual assistants in the
business world. I remember from the pre-internet days, a friend of mine who worked at a large university would earn extra money
using her home computer to type students’ assignments, or
professors’ presentations. It stands to reason then, that with the freedom the internet offers us, that the virtual assistant profession would flourish.  Originally, this was a service that many
single-operator or small businesses used, but it is becoming more common for established businesses with ample resources to seek out the services of virtual assistants.

Penni Pike is an advisor for Time, etc., the virtual assistant service started in the UK, but now successfully established in the USA as well. Penni was brought on board by the company’s founder,
Barnaby Lashbrooke to guide them in setting up the business. He said Penni provided invaluable insight into how the EA-Executive
relationship should work and what kind of support executives need. Assistants chosen to work for Time, etc., go through a thorough
vetting process, not only for administrative skills, but for
inter-personal skills such as a client-focused viewpoint,
responsiveness to clients requests, attention to detail and so on. Their VAs are a mix of mid-to-high level, offering a range of skills that are “not all admin based, but include the strategic management side of business as well” said Barnaby.

He says the VA role is not suited for everyone. Many assistants are better suited to working in an office, so Time, etc., probes the prospective assistant’s reasons for wanting to be a VA. This is an
important aspect of the vetting process because it would be
disruptive if clients like working with a particular assistant and
develop an effective working relationship, only to find out the
assistant has moved on. Quality assistants with young families who need the flexibility of working from home, yet still need to bring in an income, are the most typical profile of a VA.

Anita Armas of Anita D. Armas Administrative Services from West Covina in California told me she started her VA business because she needed freedom and flexibility when she was looking for a way to be at home with her young children while still earning an income. Anita said, “I knew there was a way to use my skills and experience to do just that but wasn’t sure how, then I heard about virtual
assistants. My husband’s business was hit hard by the financial crisis of 2008 and I needed another way to bring in additional income, so I officially began marketing myself as a virtual assistant and I soon gained my first client.”

I asked Anita what mindset a person needs to be successful as a VA. “Aside from skills, in order to be successful as a virtual assistant one must be confident, resourceful, thick-skinned, adaptable, a great communicator and have a servant’s heart. As a VA business owner, my business success depends greatly on the success of my clients. A successful VA will not just be a “doer” but will be innovative and strategically invested in his or her clients business, in order to know how to best support their client. A willingness to learn and grow are key,” says Anita. She added that some of the pitfalls a VA can
experience include the client not seeing the VA as an autonomous business owner and leaning towards an employer/employee
mentality. The client feeling a sense of exclusivity, thinking they are the only client the VA has, and lack of communication between the VA and the client.

When assistants tell me they are considering becoming a VA, I
caution them that before they leave a secure, well-paying job with benefits and career advancement opportunities, they should
consider how the uncertainty of not immediately having a steady
income might impact them. They should consider whether or not they are cut out for working alone and whether they are sufficiently disciplined to get down to work every day when they have the
option to work at their own time and pace. It’s easy to romanticize being your own boss when you are operating from the safety of a
secure job. The reality of being self employed can be a wakeup call when you have to prospect for business, deal with unhappy clients, pay bills, collect payments and furnish your own healthcare. Many VAs thrive in the role and others, after a mild flirtation with
independence, gladly return to the security of a full time job.
Evaluate your skills, your disposition and your self-discipline
thoroughly before you venture into the VA world. It is not for
everyone, particularly if you decide not to work through a platform such as Time, etc., preferring to source business on your own.

What’s exciting about all this is the many options assistants of all
calibers and experience levels have at their disposal today.  When you get excited about the opportunities, be sure to think through the potential downsides, not just the upsides. Use this article to make a Pros and Cons list for yourself. I wish you success in whatever you decide.

Author: Jan Jones

©Copyright Jan Jones, 2015 “The CEO’s Secret Weapon”

Jan Jones Worldwide

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The CEO’s Secret Weapon: How Great Leaders and Their Assistants Maximize Productivity and Effectiveness

Jan Jones


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Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.

The Citation CJ4: An Elite Light Jet

Citation Jet 4 Exterior

Photos courtesy of Cessna at cessna.txtav.com

The Cessna Citation Jet 4 is a light jet, taking its first flight in May of 2008.  According to Cessna, “the CJ4 has added speed, range and cabin size over its predecessor (Citation Jet 3) without incurring midsize jet operating costs.” While both the CJ2 and CJ3 will remain in production and available for charter, the CJ4 offers many pilot and passenger-friendly enhancements.

The Citation Jet 4 (CJ4) was designed for versatility, able to travel 2491 statute miles before needing a fuel stop. The CJ4 cruises at
average speeds of 510 mph and like the CJ3, it offers impressive short runway capabilities, allowing it to be chartered in and out of smaller airports getting passengers closer to their destination. The CJ4 differs most significantly from previous Citation Jets in its swept wing design which was modeled after the Citation Sovereign.

Citation Jet 4 Interior

The CJ4 is not only fuel-efficient, it offers single-point refueling
capabilities and can easily fly from New York to Phoenix.  The CJ4 is powered by two Williams International FJ44-4A engines each
offering 3,621 pounds of thrust. When designing the CJ4, Cessna’s engineers relocated the main landing gear inboard, thus reducing the track.  A narrower track significantly improves ground handling of the aircraft.  Cessna also prides itself on their jets’ landing gear. “The same long-stroke, trailing-link landing gear common to all CJs guarantees the softest landings and smooth taxiing.”

Citation Jet 4 Exterior

The CJ4’s cabin sits seven passengers comfortably, with two seats for the crew. As far as cabin amenities, the CJ4 has everything you need and more. “Six deep-cushioned, wide leather seats track in three directions and can be configured to fully recline for long,
comfortable trips. Each features a patented retractable armrest with available lumbar support and seat-side media docks.” The cabin offers WiFi, temperature control, and the highly regarded Rockwell Collins Venue™ High-Definition Integrated Cabin Management
System.

The CJ4’s lavatory is unique because it is externally serviceable. This aircraft also has a small refreshment center and retractable tables, perfect for conducting business or for personal entertainment
purposes. The cabin measures 17′ 4″ in length, 4′ 9″ in height and 4′ 10″ in width. The external baggage space in the Citation Jet 4 is
generous at 77 cubic feet and can hold several pieces of luggage.

CJ4s are well liked by passengers and pilots alike for their
reputation of superior performance, range and speed.

To request a CJ4 for your next trip, please contact us. We would be happy to provide you with a flight quote.

Citation CJ4 Specifications

We’d love to hear from you! Please follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn Google+, Twitter and Instagram for the latest news and updates from FlyPrivate.

Website: www.flyprivate.com
Email: fly@flyprivate.com
Phone: 1-800-641-JETS (5387)

All flights arranged by Private Business Jets, LLC DBA FlyPrivate are operated by Part 135 Certified Air Carriers. FlyPrivate will act as your agent for the purpose of obtaining charter service.